As quoted from Dr. Judson Brewer MD/PhD, who has created a smoking cessation program based on mindfulness, following the quote from Buddha, I also put Dr. Brewer’s interpretation. The reason I share this is I think it is amazing when I apply this to my own life (and the amount of coffee I drink). I get nothing but the craving for more coffee. Yet, when I was working in the garden last night, it was fulfilling into its own right (I was also drinking water at the time). Bein a recovering addict myself, I would argue (or hypothesize, depending on the audience) that the coffee releases alot of endorphins in my brain, thereby setting up the addictive cycle. The gardening only releases enough endorphins to satiate me.

“I set out seeking the gratification in the world.
Whatever gratification there is in the world, that I have found.
I have clearly seen with wisdom just how far the gratification in the world extends.”
– Buddha

“In other words, when the Buddha looked closely at what he was actually getting from his actions (I’m guessing he didn’t smoke, but who knows?), he saw that their delivery never lived up to their promise. By following his urges, he was just perpetuating suffering because gratification of his desires was not only short-lived, but it set up the habit to crave these actions more. He dubbed this process samsara or endless wandering, because it was self-perpetuating.” – Brewer

May you have a day of self-reflection (introspection) and figure out what habits need to be changed, what can be tolerated, and what habits are healthy and helpful in your life.